Equal Parental Rights for Fathers and Equity in Child Custody Cases for BOTH Parents.

Create state guidelines in regards to child custody to give children what is in their right, equal time with each parent. Gender should not be the basis of parental time and custody determination. When both parents are present and parenting, the state guideline should be 50/50 custody, to allow the child equal access to both parents. This should not be left up to the subjectivity of a judge. Fathers should not have to fight for the right to be present and be parents. A father’s time with his child is no less valuable than a mother’s. Children need both parents and deserve equal access to both. Unbalanced rights in custody only lead to more conflict, of which the child is most affected. It is time to end the gender bias and recognize the value of both parents, in a child’s life.

MoveOn PetitionsCustody Guidelines for Children of Divorce

This petition is an attempt to attain equal parental rights for fathers and equity in child custody for both parents and, most importantly, guarantee what should be the right of every child to have equal access to both parents. The push pull of unbalanced rights can often serve as a detriment for children of divorced parents. I have been affected by the prevalent gender bias displayed by many courts, and it in no way has benefited my daughter. It is for what is in her best interests, and what she should have a right to, that I started this petition.

Source: MoveOn Petitions – Custody Guidelines for Children of Divorce

The ActivistSIGN ~ INVITE FRIENDS ~ SHARE THIS PETITION ! !

It’s time to sign now. Join 7,455 supporters… Go… Go… Go… If you are to end the war on Children and parents and for equality for all parents and children…Please sign and share the petition to declare : ” 2017 | International Year of co-parenting ” 

 Important – Go here to share the petition and invite your friends and network on Facebook

Positive ambassadors for involved fatherhood, at-home dads need to resist the urge to take offense and instead use these thoughtless comments as “teaching moments.” In this way, they can be more effective and positive as they change the out-of-date attitudes of those around them. I came up with a phrase for this very purpose:

“Almost every dad I know is putting in the work to be a loving, hands-on, involved dad”icmi16-finalfinal1

As in:
“I loved that movie from 1983, too (“Mr. Mom”), but that’s not what most dads or at-home dads do today. In fact, almost every dad I know is putting in the work to be a loving, hands-on, involved dad.“
“I know you mean no offense, but I don’t babysit my kids, I’m just being their father. And, you know, almost every dad I know is putting in the work to be a loving, hands-on, involved dad.”
“Almost every dad I know is putting in the work to be a loving, hands-on, involved dad. I just happen to do it full-time, as it made more sense for my family that my wife works. All families should arrange things the best way for them, don’t you think?”
“I’m here with my kids. More and more dads are doing things like this. After all, almost every dad I know is putting in the work to be a loving, hands-on, involved dad. Which are your kids, maybe they can join mine on the monkey bars?”
“I know you mean that (“great dad”) as a compliment, and thank you. But, you know, almost every dad I know is putting in the work to be a loving, hands-on, involved dad. I’m not doing anything more than most dads- or moms- do.”
Progress can come one conversation at a time. I’m very confident that the awesome guys I met at the convention will more than do their part. Honestly, I’m not sure I could restrain the urge to say something rude if faced with such thoughtless comments. But rising above thoughtlessness is the key to being a positive ambassador.

The dads at this convention seemed to like the phrase and, in fact, a few told me they used some variant of it during their flights back home when fellow passengers saw them wearing their “At-Home Dad Convention” and “Dads Don’t Babysit” t-shirts.

My experience at this convention also led me to think about working dads, and what we can do to be ambassadors of involved fatherhood at our workplaces. Here are a few ideas:

Talk about family while at work and make it easier for others in your sphere of influence to do so. For instance, ask them about what they did with their families on weekends, or have family pictures prominently displayed at your workstation.

Gather a group of fellow working dads and go out to lunch or a happy-hour together every few weeks. Combine this with a mom’s group if you’d like.
When you need to, leave early and take work home. Don’t apologize for it. Your continued work performance will win over initial skeptics.
Ask management and HR about what policies they offer. Share with them the news of what leading companies offer.

Take paternity leave when it’s offered. Be visible about it. Share your experiences on social media. Especially if you are a manager, you play an especially important role. If your employees see you adjust your schedule for family, occasionally work from home, and even take paternity leave, you send a strong signal that it is ok for others to do so. Your actions speak much louder than your words.

Push the need for leave and flexibility policies with HR and top management. Make the business case in terms of attracting and retaining employees, as well as improving engagement. Beyond paternity leave or workplace flexibility, talk with your employees, coworkers and bosses about the importance of time for life. After all, almost every dad I know is putting in the work to be a loving, hands-on, involved dad.

Whether we work outside the home or have made parenting our full-time job, we need to be ambassadors for involved fatherhood. That’s how society and workplaces will finally catch on to what most of us do every day.

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afla2016

Goals of the Fathers' Rights Movement The fathers' rights movement arose in response to the perception that fathers were not being given equal treatment in child custody litigation. Fathers' advocacy groups typically to focus upon some or all of the following beliefs: A "traditional" division of parental roles during a marriage should not of itself mean that the father should not be considered as a custodian following divorce; Children are best served by being in the care of both parents, and thus there should be a legal presumption of joint physical custody and equal parenting time following divorce; Fathers are at a disadvantage throughout the entire custody litigation process. Fathers' rights groups assert that changes of this nature will create a family court environment where both parents are treated fairly and equally, and diminish the effects of legislation and, in some cases, of judicial bias which favors the mother. Fathers' rights groups also typically point to studies which show that the absence of a father from a child's life can lead to a wide variety of negative behavioral and educational consequences. Because We’re Not Asking You To Make A Career Out Of This Cause. We’re just asking you to show your kids and everyone else what it means to have the integrity to stand up for others and do what’s right; regardless of your personal circumstances. We’re asking you to make a powerful point by speaking with what you do; not with what you say you’ll do. Are you with us? The BEST Parent is BOTH Parents JOIN US~~> www.causes.com/AFLA JOIN US~~> www.causes.com/causes/804504-american-fathers-rights-afla

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