An Example of an Anti-Father’s Rights, Liberal Moron!

If You Support Men’s and Father’s For Equal Parental Rights, You Have to Vote for Cara Nicole, Not Juan Mendez! Why? Because Juan Mendez, An Example of an Anti-Father’s Rights, Liberal Moron!  – Men’s Rights Group of AZ

If you think Juan Mendez is a complete fool, moron and just unfit to hold public office your not the only one!

In fact, according to the American’s for Parental Equality and men’s rights advocates, you could be right!

Many men’s and father’s rights activist have long held the opinion that Juan Mendez has single-handedly  worked against legislation to change bias family court laws. This opinion appears to be true in recent public statements Juan Mendez has made.

Juan Mendez was recently asked,

“What do you plan to do to bring equality to fathers being denied rights to their children in family court when there is no domestic violence or criminal history?”

Juan Mendez looked a little shocked by the question and even asked for it to be repeated so he could compose himself. Then, the idiot (in our opinion) spilled his feminist guts.

At least from his statements…

Mendez openly plans to keep denying father’s rights to their biological children.

A Facebook video of this moron has now reached 34 thousand views of how Mendez side-stepped the entire question while throwing a bone to his liberal-feminist allies.

Source: Juan Mendez, An Example of an Anti-Father’s Rights, Liberal Moron! – Men’s Rights Group of AZ

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Turner v. Rogers ~ The absolute right to legal representation in child support enforcement cases.

Turner v. Rogers, 564 U.S. 431 is a case decided by the United States Supreme Court on June 20, 2011, that held that a state must provide safeguards to reduce the risk of erroneous deprivation of liberty 

End date: 2011  Docket number: 10  Citation: 564

GUEST POST: Turner v. Rogers and What It Means To Me | Criminal Law & Psychology Blog

[Chris Castanias is a father of two who was held in civil contempt for failure to pay child support. Although he requested appointed counsel due to his indigent status, the domestic relations court refused to entertain his request and he was subsequently sentenced to over 90 days in jail. In this piece, he shares his experience. — Zachary Cloud]

Divorce can be financially devastating, and equally so for both mother and father.

Imagine for a moment that you experience a 50% reduction in pay and at the same time are ordered by a court to pay not only your rent or mortgage, but that of your neighbor. Could you do it?

The economics of that scenario are similar to that of an obligor (the person ordered to pay child-support), previously living in a typical two-earner, two-child household. What happens at divorce is that the earners split up and no longer jointly contribute to the family’s financial obligations, while the designated obligor picks up an additional involuntary debt (child-support obligation) that is likely close to that of his or her existing rent or mortgage payment.

In the fictional situation described above, would you consider it fair if you were at risk of being jailed for not making both your and your neighbors housing payment in any given month. If you faced the potential of jail, would you want legal representation? If you couldn’t afford to make the housing payments, how likely would you be to afford an attorney. Is it possible that financial scenario might create a situation where you would need to ask for court appointed counsel?

There are similar parallels to my hypothetical scenario, the case of Turner v Rogers and many countless others who have been sentenced to jail without being allowed representation of legal counsel, after allegedly falling behind with child-support obligations.

The world is currently experiencing the worst economic period in modern history. In this country, foreclosures are at record high levels, yet no one is imprisoned for failing to pay their mortgage or defaulting on their rent. In 2008, statistics show that nearly 16 million child-support obligors nationwide were in default on the child-support obligation. One state, Illinois reported 88% of their obligors to be past due. For more information, see here.

I’m writing as an strong advocate of Michael Turner, because I personally experienced the exact same fate, and since the completion of what I feel was an unjust  imprisonment over a year ago, I’ve no longer had any access to my children.

Continue reading Turner v. Rogers ~ The absolute right to legal representation in child support enforcement cases.

Changing the outcome of your family court case!

WHY MEN LOSE IN FAMILY COURTgoodbyeson-j4mb-2016

Dear Friend and Fellow Advocate,

Thanks for visiting our site! Like most individuals you have probably come to our site for one primary reason. You are looking for answers to a specific Fathers rights family law problem. Let me assure you that you’ve come to the right place. We have the answers you need!Image result for WHY MEN LOSE IN FAMILY COURT

The subject of this article is “Why Do Men Lose In Family Court?” I have spent the last 23 years attempting to answer this question. After considerable research, case evaluations and client interviews I believe I now have the answer.

 

Twenty three years ago I went through a brutal divorce. Actually, at the time of divorce we were very friendly with one another and agreed to settle out of court. My Ex-wife, through a paralegal filed for divorce and like most men I simply agreed to the terms. I walked away with nothing! I surrendered the house, ($40,000.00 in equity) the boat, the car, furniture etc. etc…Everything I had acquired in 13 years of marriage was suddenly gone. We had three children and I wanted them to have the benefit of these items. Although I didn’t realize it at the time I could have and should have made better agreements that would have benefited all members of my family in a much greater way.
Looking back I simply didn’t know what a good agreement was or how to make the deal. I was so concerned about maintaining a good relationship with my ex that I avoided anything that might have resulted in a legal battle. I should have filed my response with the court and requested an equitable division of property, custody, visitation and a support order that was based on my Real income. In general I should have been more attentive to the legal issues. This was truly a mistake!
Continue reading Changing the outcome of your family court case!